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The CHROMacademy Essential Guide Webcast:
Nitrogen as a Carrier Gas for Capillary GC
 

Wednesday 17th February 2016,
8:00am PDT / 11:00am EDT / 16:00 BST / 17:00 CEST

Nitrogen is not considered as a viable carrier gas for capillary GC – however many capillary GC methods would work perfectly well with Nitrogen.  The long run times and loss of sensitivity typically associated with Nitrogen carrier can be easily avoided.

This educational event will explain how to identify methods which may be compatible with Nitrogen carrier, and shows how method translation can be used to establish acceptable chromatographic performance.

We will also discuss the use of narrower internal diameter capillary GC columns to give comparable performance to existing methods and for high efficiency when developing new methods with Nitrogen carrier.

Presented by Tony Taylor (Technical Director, Crawford Scientific).


Key Learning Objectives:

  • Understand why different carrier gases produce different results in gas chromatography
  • Learn how these differences can be understood through the terms of the van Deemter equation
  • Understand why using Nitrogen carrier with capillary GC columns can give problems
  • Identify which GC methods are suitable for use with Nitrogen GC carrier
  • Understand what changes need to be made to existing methods to make them suitable for use with Nitrogen carrier gas
  • Understand how to use narrow internal diameter columns to achieve high efficiency when using Nitrogen carrier
  • See examples of various capillary GC methods performed using Nitrogen carrier gas

Who Should Attend:

  • Anyone using GC
  • Anyone wishing to find an alternative to Helium as a GC carrier gas
 
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Find out more about this Month's Essential Guide Webcast »

 
 

Nitrogen as a Carrier Gas for Capillary GC - Tutorial

Nitrogen is not considered as a viable carrier for capillary GC; however, many capillary GC methods would work perfectly well with nitrogen.  The long run times and loss of sensitivity typically associated with nitrogen carrier can be easily avoided.

This educational event will explain how to identify methods which may be compatible with nitrogen carrier gas, and shows how method translation can be used to establish acceptable chromatographic performance.

We will also discuss the use of narrower internal diameter capillary GC columns to give comparable performance to existing methods and for high efficiency when developing new methods with nitrogen carrier gas.

Watch the webcast and delve into our CHROMacademy material to further your knowledge of GC.

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eLearning Modules


Electrospray Ionization Theory Gas Supply and Pressure Control

The carrier gas in GC is the heart of the technique. This module will provide an understanding of the nature and quality of gases required for GC analysis. How the pressure and flow of the gas is controlled by the instrument will be detailed, along with the effect of carrier gas flow (constant pressure vs. constant flow) on analyses. Carrier gas can be supplied using gas cylinders or generators, the topic of which source is most suitable for a particular laboratory or application will be discussed.

Gases Required for GC | Quality of Gas Supply | Gas Generators Using Hydrogen in the Lab

 
 
Interactive GC Troubleshooter
The CHROMacademy GC troubleshooter The CHROMacademy GC troubleshooter

An online interactive version of the much loved troubleshooting poster you see on lab walls all over the world.

A valuable resource for analytical scientists who wish to more accurately diagnose issues with equipment and separations.

Get answers fast, reduce downtime, improve efficiency

Start GC Troubleshooting »

 
 
Quick Guides

Electrospray Ionization Theory Crimes Against GC Gas Filters

Are you guilty of any of our most commonly committed ‘crimes’ against GC gas filters?

Crimes Against GC Gas Filters »

 
Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

Helium to Hydrogen - A Change Would Do You Good

Change is always a scary concept but let us dispel some of the fear associated with changing your helium carrier gas to hydrogen by answering some of the most common questions posed to us.  John V. Hinshaw our GC department editor has written a comprehensive article answering the questions below in great detail.  Here we have highlighted the key points to help get you started.

Helium to Hydrogen - A Change Would Do You Good »

 
Electrospray Ionization Theory Gas Quality For GC

The quality of carrier gas used in a GC system is of the utmost importance. Gases which contain moisture, oxygen, or contaminants can have a serious detrimental effect on the GC system, GC column, and ultimately chromatographic results. The use of the correct gases for detectors is a must, with the cleanliness of the gas being an important factor. This webcast will discuss all of the important considerations on selecting the correct gas with the correct cleanliness for your GC system and detector. Common problems will also be highlighted in order for GC users to spot them quickly when they occur.

Gas Quality For GC »

 
Translating to Hydrogen Carrier for GC - A Practical Perspective

The Essential Guide from LCGC’s CHROMacademy presents the definitive guide in translating your GC and GCMS methods from Helium to Hydrogen carrier gas. In this session, Tony Taylor (Technical Director, Crawford Scientific) and Dr. Dawn Watson (Technical Expert, CHROMacademy, Crawford Scientific) explore the various reasons for translating GC methods to Hydrogen carrier including improved chromatography and faster throughput. The chromatographic benefits of adopting modern column geometries in conjunction with Hydrogen carrier gas will also be discussed. We will highlight a very practical approach to method translation based on experience, and we will feature many tools and calculations which can be used to ease the translation experience, and maximize the benefits! We will discuss regulatory challenges, such as, the need for method re-validation and approaches to verifying translated methods.

Translating to Hydrogen Carrier for GC - A Practical Perspective »

 
Translating GC Methods from Helium to Hydrogen Carrier Gas

The Essential Guide from LCGC’s CHROMacademy presents the definitive guide in translating your GC methods for use with Hydrogen Carrier. In this session, Dr. John Hinshaw (Senior Scientist , BPL Global Ltd) and Tony Taylor (Technical Director, Crawford Scientific) consider the impact of the global issues with Helium supply on Gas Chromatography methods. We consider the use of hydrogen as an alternative carrier gas to Helium and present the facts around Hydrogen safety and use within the laboratory. We study method translation, including all of the important method and instrument parameters to ensure retention, selectivity and resolution are maintained. We consider the use and limitations of hydrogen carrier with mass spectrometric detectors and finally highlight some of the advantages of working with a carrier capable of producing high efficiency at higher flow rate.

Translating GC Methods from Helium to Hydrogen Carrier Gas »

 
GC Troubleshooting - Gas Supply and Inlet Issues

The Essential Guide from LCGC’s CHROMacademy presents the first in our series of webcasts on Practical GC Troubleshooting. In this session, Dr. John Hinshaw (Senior Scientist , BPL Global Ltd) and Tony Taylor (Technical Director, Crawford Scientific), present practical troubleshooting and maintenance information associated with gas supply and management, autosamplers and split / splitless sample inlets. This session considers good practice for gas supply and delivery, electronic pressure control issues and gas quality management. We also investigate common problems and mistakes in choosing sample solvents and issues with autosamplers and syringes. We consider the most common instrument problems and mistakes associated with split / splitless inlets and examine essential maintenance to help avoid the pitfalls. We include examples of the impact of all issues considered on chromatography and quantitative data analysis and consider various troubleshooting tests and diagnostics that might be used. A must see for everyone working with GC instruments.

GC Troubleshooting - Gas Supply and Inlet Issues »

 
What GC Operators Need to Know - Part 1: From Gas Supply and Inlets to Column Selection and Temperature Programming

During this two part event we will look at the whole GC process from sampling, to injection, separation, and detection. We will provide practical hints and tips for the essential GC parameters in order to make your use of this powerful technique straightforward and successful. Firstly we will discuss the gases required for GC, critical choices in gas sampling and sample preparation, and how to optimize your sample injection routine. Column selection is probably one of the most important choices in any chromatographic method; therefore, we will share our insights on how to select the correct column each time. Finally, we will detail how to utilize and optimize isothermal and temperature programmed methods to produce optimum resolution.

What GC Operators Need to Know »

 
 
 
 
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Key Learning Objectives:

  • Understand why different carrier gases produce different results in gas chromatography
  • Learn how these differences can be understood through the terms of the van Deemter equation
  • Understand why using Nitrogen carrier with capillary GC columns can give problems
  • Identify which GC methods are suitable for use with Nitrogen GC carrier
  • Understand what changes need to be made to existing methods to make them suitable for use with Nitrogen carrier gas
  • Understand how to use narrow internal diameter columns to achieve high efficiency when using Nitrogen carrier
  • See examples of various capillary GC methods performed using Nitrogen carrier gas

Who Should Attend:

  • Anyone using GC
  • Anyone wishing to find an alternative to Helium as a GC carrier gas

 

Tony Taylor Technical Director, Crawford Scientific